2015

Qizhou Zhang: Magnetic Fields and Massive Star Formation

Qizhou Zhang: Magnetic Fields and Massive Star Formation

December 1, 2015

Stars are assembled in molecular clouds when matters condense and collapse under the gravitational pull. Massive stars (M > 8 Msun) are found mostly in clusters together with lower mass stellar objects (Lada & Lada 2003). How parsec-scale, massive molecular clumps collapse and fragment to give rise to a cluster of stars has been one of the central questions in star formation in the past decade. Jeans mass, the characteristic mass of fragments, is 1Msun for typical physical conditions in (pre) cluster forming clumps (Zhang et al. 2009, 2015).

Tiny, Ultracool Star is Super Stormy

Tiny, Ultracool Star is Super Stormy

November 19, 2015

"Our Sun is a relatively quiet star that only occasionally releases solar flares or blasts of energetic particles that threaten satellites and power grids. You might think that smaller, cooler stars would be even more sedate. However, astronomers have now identified a tiny star with a monstrous temper. It shows evidence of much stronger flares than anything our Sun produces. If similar stars prove to be just as stormy, then potentially habitable planets orbiting them are likely to be much less hospitable than previously thought"

Professor Ramesh Narayan was elected a Fellow of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS

Professor Ramesh Narayan was elected a Fellow of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS

November 19, 2015

Professor Ramesh Narayan was elected a Fellow of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS). TWAS is a global science academy based in Trieste, Italy, working to advance science and engineering for sustainable prosperity in the developing world.

Read More: http://twas.org/article/twas-elects-44-new-fellows

2015  Fellows of the American Physical Society

2015 Fellows of the American Physical Society

October 13, 2015

Avi Loeb (Harvard), Douglas Finkbeiner (Harvard), and Patrick Slane (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory) have been selected as Fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). This is a high honor, restricted to 0.5% of the membership in a given year. They were nominated by the APS Division of Astrophysics (DAP) because of their leading contributions to the field. APS will present the Fellowship certificates at the APS April Meeting.