Gamma-ray burst illuminates invisible galaxy in the "dark ages"

August 7, 2013
Gamma-ray burst illuminates invisible galaxy in the "dark ages"

More than 12 billion years ago a star exploded, ripping itself apart and blasting its remains outward in twin jets at nearly the speed of light. At its death it glowed so brightly that it outshone its entire galaxy by a million times.  Associate Professor Edo Berger and Ryan Chornock, a scientist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, were able to gear up quickly to collect data on it's afterglow just hours after it was detected by NASA's Swift spacecraft on June 6th.

For more information on the significance of this event and what has since been learned from the data collected from the explosion, please consult this press release.

Image from gamma-ray blast

See also: News Media, 2013