Faculty

Black and white photo of an asteroid ‘Oumuamua, rock floating in space

How to Search for Dead Cosmic Civilizations If they’re short-lived, we might be able to detect the relics and artifacts they left behind

October 1, 2018

"The rate of growth of new technologies is often proportional to past knowledge, leading to an exponential advance over time. This explosive process implies that very quickly after a civilization reaches technological maturity, it will develop the means for its own destruction through climate change, for example, or nuclear, biological or chemical weapons. Developments of this type, over mere hundreds of years, would appear abrupt in the cosmic perspective of billions of years. If such self-destruction is common, this could explain Fermi’s paradox, which asks “where is everybody?”—and...

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Two hands with a Cats Cradle string with images of crows

The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with Philosophy: In some domains the two knowledge systems are complementary, but in others they might be headed for conflict

September 17, 2018

Avi Loeb's latest Scientific American blog, "Scientific discoveries substantiate our awe when faced with the richness and universality of the laws of nature. But science falls short of explaining this natural order and why it exists in the first place."

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